Weaning and poo problems!

An obsession with poo is one of the weirder aspects of being a parent. Should he be pooing more? Is her poo a normal colour?

 A few weeks in, things have mostly settled down and parents generally feel more confident about their baby’s pooing habits (although it’s often still a major topic of interest).

 But when your baby starts on solid food, it’s all change again. Poo becomes thicker, darker – and smellier. Pooing habits can undergo a transformation too, with babies pooing more or less. 

 It doesn’t really matter how often (or not) your baby poos. The main thing is that the poo is soft and your baby doesn’t have a problem getting their poos out. If your baby is really straining to poo, and/or their poos are hard and either very large or small and pellet-like (think rabbit poo…) they may be constipated. Diluted fruit juice can help because fruits such as apples, pears and prunes contain sorbitol which acts as a natural laxative or you could see your doctor about prescribing some laxatives. Constipation is best avoided by giving your baby lots of fruit and vegetables, and plenty of drinks of water.

 One of the stranger aspects of baby poo post-weaning is finding bits of food in their nappy, with sweetcorn and raisons typical foods that come out the other side. This is because these foods are only partially digested, and/or go through your baby so quickly that they don’t have the time to completely break down. Poo can also change colour depending on what your baby has eaten – so orange for carrots or dark blue for blueberries. It takes colour coding to a whole new level.

If your baby gets diarrhoea, you have our sympathies because this is generally grim for all involved. Some sort of bug is the obvious culprit, but it may be a sign of an allergy to something they’ve eaten.

 As a final thought, although nappy changes can become an altogether trickier operation once your baby is on solids, the transformation in your baby’s poo is at least a reassuring sign that they are actually eating some food rather than getting it anywhere but in their mouths.

An obsession with poo is one of the weirder aspects of being a parent. Should he be pooing more? Is her poo a normal colour?

 A few weeks in, things have mostly settled down and parents generally feel more confident about their baby’s pooing habits (although it’s often still a major topic of interest).

 But when your baby starts on solid food, it’s all change again. Poo becomes thicker, darker – and smellier. Pooing habits can undergo a transformation too, with babies pooing more or less. 

 It doesn’t really matter how often (or not) your baby poos. The main thing is that the poo is soft and your baby doesn’t have a problem getting their poos out. If your baby is really straining to poo, and/or their poos are hard and either very large or small and pellet-like (think rabbit poo…) they may be constipated. Diluted fruit juice can help because fruits such as apples, pears and prunes contain sorbitol which acts as a natural laxative or you could see your doctor about prescribing some laxatives. Constipation is best avoided by giving your baby lots of fruit and vegetables, and plenty of drinks of water.

 One of the stranger aspects of baby poo post-weaning is finding bits of food in their nappy, with sweetcorn and raisons typical foods that come out the other side. This is because these foods are only partially digested, and/or go through your baby so quickly that they don’t have the time to completely break down. Poo can also change colour depending on what your baby has eaten – so orange for carrots or dark blue for blueberries. It takes colour coding to a whole new level.

If your baby gets diarrhoea, you have our sympathies because this is generally grim for all involved. Some sort of bug is the obvious culprit, but it may be a sign of an allergy to something they’ve eaten.

 As a final thought, although nappy changes can become an altogether trickier operation once your baby is on solids, the transformation in your baby’s poo is at least a reassuring sign that they are actually eating some food rather than getting it anywhere but in their mouths.


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